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Weight placement side-to-side

Discussion in 'Building tips' started by firestone, Jan 8, 2020.

  1. firestone

    firestone Pack Champion

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    Quick question, probably an easy one:

    When I look at photos of ladder cars and cube weights, it seems that the weight is arranged so a little more is on one side of the car. I'm assuming this is to help steer into the rail, is that right?

    And is the idea that a little more weight on one side pushes the car to the opposite side?
     
  2. Jimmy & his 2 Kids

    Jimmy & his 2 Kids National Contender

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    One thing I do know is a little more weight on DFW means a bit more “bite” regarding steer.
     
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  3. Thinkin'Bout Racin

    Thinkin'Bout Racin National Contender

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    Extra weight is normally placed on the same side as your DFW. There are several reasons and thoughts/ideas for this. The main reason is to equal out some of the load on the two rear wheels.

    Think about your weight distribution for a moment. If you only have 3 wheels touching, you are going to have a different amount of weight on each wheel. The imbalance of the two rears is mainly caused because the FDW "shares" the weight on that side of the car. Remember, that because of this, the x axis is not on the centerline of the car. This creates an imbalance on the rears. This also creates more load/weight on the NDRW. So, additional weight is normally added to the FDW side of the car just in front of the rear axale, to help out to even the load on the rears.

    There are those that believe that the rears should be balanced and there are some that think anything less than 10-12 grams between the two rears is acceptable. Each builder has their own preference.
     
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  4. Reecedad

    Reecedad League Racer

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    You should start with about 12g on the front wheel and 60g on the wheel behind it and 70g on the other rear.
     
  5. Charles Studer

    Charles Studer League Racer Pro Racer

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  6. Charles Studer

    Charles Studer League Racer Pro Racer

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    Maybe that will help.....
     
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  7. flockshot

    flockshot Rail Runner

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    Is the goal to put the Center of Mass in the center of the car?
     
  8. Pack76oldtown

    Pack76oldtown Pinewood Ninja

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    Is the weight balancing not as important as a 4 wheel touching rail-rider?
    My front right tire has the primary steer at 3” over 4’. The left front has only 1” per 4’.
     
  9. Charles Studer

    Charles Studer League Racer Pro Racer

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    Typically a little bias to the dominant side say 5-10 gms
     

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