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When to drill

Discussion in 'Building tips' started by Kurtis Long, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Kurtis Long

    Kurtis Long Pinewood Ninja

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    So I have seen many people say first drill your block, check alignment, then cut out the rest of your body and that makes sense. Then I seen one guy say that he would do that and have perfect alignment then after he cut the body out it would change the alignment a little. Now seeing that we are dealing with wood, I definitely understand how it could move around after you cut out your body. So... what do we do?
     
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  2. Jimmy & his 2 Kids

    Jimmy & his 2 Kids National Contender

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    Now this is just me... I’m no guru but my kids haven’t lost an Awana race in 4 years either. Lol
    But that’s not really saying much since it’s not serious racing either so just to say this works for me...
    Cut my 5/16 wedge body blank. Then drill, (check for bad tow in rears using 1,2 3 block method or similar) then hollow out ladder shape. Once body is done then I set alignment.

    Gurus here hopefully will chime in.

    Hope that helps.
    Jimmy
     
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  3. Thinkin'Bout Racin

    Thinkin'Bout Racin National Contender

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    Great question ....you will get a variety of answers on it. I don't know what the right answer is, because I believe it somewhat depends upon how you build. I think drill first then body work and drill after body work both can/are effective. Remember that the wood comes from a living thing. No two blocks are going to be identical. A pro that has built hundreds of cars, can probably pick up a block, look at the grain, and feel how heavy it is and probably tell you if it will drill straight and stay straight afterwards. Unfortunately, I am not that person.

    I think it also depends if you cover your car with vinyl or if you paint. While working with Cubs, I know we have warped a body by getting it too light and then applying a coat of primer that was too heavy. Lesson learned ....change out something in the process for next time.

    I would suggest that you try it one or both ways. Test your drill a few times during a build. Come up with what works for you and your building style. Refine your process and keep building cars. Each car will likely get a little better!
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
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  4. TRE

    TRE PWD Royalty Pro Race Winner Pro Racer

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    I do it both ways...it usually better after you do the weight pockets
     
  5. Loud2ns

    Loud2ns Rail Runner

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    I drill mine and have my kids drill theirs after the weight pockets are cut.
     
  6. Deckard

    Deckard Pinewood Ninja

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    Excuse my lack of knowledge but what is the 1,2,3 block method?
     
  7. STK Racing

    STK Racing Pack Champion

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  8. Prozach2

    Prozach2 District Champion

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    For you guys that drill axle holes last, and use a ladder body, do you ever break or damage your car when you put it in the jig? I have the Silver Bullet Extreme, and the blocks fit pretty tight. I assume this is by design to make sure the block doesn't shift around at all while it's in the jig being drilled. But, I was concerned that if I didn't drill my axle holes first before hollowing out the car, the car might break when I put it in the jig. That being said, by drilling axle holes first, I was concerned that I did so much cutting, sanding, sawing, etc. on the car after the axle holes were drilled, maybe the axle holes shifted some in the process.
     
  9. TRE

    TRE PWD Royalty Pro Race Winner Pro Racer

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    The block shouldnt be that tight
     
  10. Loud2ns

    Loud2ns Rail Runner

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    Sand the side a bit on a flat surface till it fits good.
     
  11. ratrodsrule1

    ratrodsrule1 National Contender

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    These cars are so touchy. In a graphite only deal in an area where you can have triple digit heat and humidity at the same time. I've often wondered if even the humidity has an effect ?
     
  12. Jimmy & his 2 Kids

    Jimmy & his 2 Kids National Contender

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    Ladder out first. Then one one side of the cross bar where axle holes goes I added 1/64 ply with grain going side to side. CA'd that on there and it really stiffens it up. Light sanding the sides (careful) to make sure fits good but not too tight like L2ns said. Clamp then drill. No worries.
    The 1/64 ply really helps.
    Hope that helps.
     
  13. T-Bone Racing

    T-Bone Racing Pinewood Ninja

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    I draw out the lines I’m going to cut, drill the body, then cut it out. I usually don’t get a change in alignment as long as I don’t cut the axle hole open. And like Jimmy and his 2 kids said, strips of plywood on that axle hole bridge really helps, I’ve had cars without it break because of shipping, and it’s not fun.
     
  14. ratrodsrule1

    ratrodsrule1 National Contender

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    Stepping out of AWAna into Porxy the ole $19.95 jig ain't gonna git it done. But with medical bills keeping the price point of the super jigs out of the question would the new Derby Work 3.0 be good enough for a merchandise received for money spent scenario ?
     
  15. ljo

    ljo District Champion

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    I would look for a used pro level jig, or buy predrilled bodies until you are able to get the jig you want. It looks like the DW 3.0 does have drill bushings, but the tool is very thin, and in my opinion it would be very difficult to get a nice drill with it.
     
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  16. ratrodsrule1

    ratrodsrule1 National Contender

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    Thanks LJO would def be interested in a good used Pro jig of some sort. Medical bills are keeping me out of the NEW route. Help keep a look out with me if you don't mind please. Pre-drilled IS an option but it kinda takes to challenge out of it. Thanks Brother.......RRR
     
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